Stephen Fry’s hilarious reaction to a ‘frisky’ bird in 2009 wildlife show goes viral


‘You are being s*****d by a rare parrot’: Stephen Fry’s hilarious reaction to a ‘frisky’ bird leaves fans in stitches as clip from 2009 wildlife show goes viral

A clip from a 2009 wildlife documentary starring Stephen Fry has resurfaced after fans were left in hysterics by his reaction to a ‘frisky’ bird.

The 65-year-old actor appeared on an episode of BBC Two’s Last Chance to See alongside zoologist Mark Carwardine where they traveled to New Zealand to see the endangered kākāpō bird – a large, flightless parrot.

The pair were able to track down Sirocco – one of the last remaining kākāpōs – but got more than they bargained for when the plucky bird attempted to mate with Mark.

‘You are being s*****d by a rare parrot’: Stephen Fry’s hilarious reaction to a ‘frisky’ bird in a 2009 wildlife documentary has left fans in stitches after it resurfaced

In the hilarious scenes, Mark was seen attempting to photograph the parrot before it leapt onto his neck and began waddling and thrusting in an urgent manner – seemingly mistaking the zoologist’s green jumper for a mate.

Looking on in shock a bewildered Stephen asked: He’s getting a bit frisky – do you think he’s actually attempting a sort of mating ritual?’

He then quipped: ‘You are being s*****d! Look, he’s so happy!

Spreading his wings: The 65-year-old actor appeared on an episode of BBC Two's Last Chance to See alongside zoologist Mark Carwardine where they traveled to New Zealand

Spreading his wings: The 65-year-old actor appeared on an episode of BBC Two’s Last Chance to See alongside zoologist Mark Carwardine where they traveled to New Zealand

Let me see you shake your tailfeather: They found Sirocco - one of the last remaining k¿k¿p¿s - but got more than they bargained for when the plucky bird attempted to mate with Mark

Let me see you shake your tailfeather: They found Sirocco – one of the last remaining kākāpōs – but got more than they bargained for when the plucky bird attempted to mate with Mark

‘I’m sorry but its one of the funniest things I’ve ever seen. You are being s*****d by a rare parrot. He thinks you’re a female… He’s really going for it!’

After a member of the crew came to Mark’s aid by removing the amorous parrot from his neck it emerged the rather boisterous bird had caused some damage, leaving Mark with puncture wounds from his claws.

Yet unable to resist having another laugh, Stephen couldn’t resist quipping: ‘When you have the chick, I want you to call it Stephen.’

Ruffling feathers: As the clip resurfaced on social media fans were left in hysterics

Ruffling feathers: As the clip resurfaced on social media fans were left in hysterics

As the clip resurfaced on social media, fans were left in hysterics, commenting: ‘That’s gonna ruffle some feather’; ‘Is it me or does the Parrot look like Stephen Fry’;

‘This explains why they are rare Poor Parrots❤️’; ‘Being a rear NZ bird it needs to copulate with whatever is available’; ‘honest to god how funny’;

‘still viral lol’; ‘I can’t breathe’; ‘this will always be, without a doubt, the funniest thing I have seen on the internet.’

Bird brain: Mark was seen attempting to photograph the parrot before it leapt onto his neck and began waddling and thrusting in an urgent manner

Bird brain: Mark was seen attempting to photograph the parrot before it leapt onto his neck and began waddling and thrusting in an urgent manner

Since appearing on the BBC Two show Sirocco has become a big name on the bird scene.

The unlucky-in-love parrot was given the title of Official Spokesbird for Conservation by Prime Minister John Key in 2010 and has the important role of advocating for conservation through human intermediaries on social media sites and blogs.

The media-savvy bird was also the subject of filmmaker Ashwika Kapur’s short ‘rags-to-riches’ documentary Sirocco – How a Dud Became a Stud and won the Wildscreen Panda Award in 2014.

Sirocco is also the inspiration for the party parrot animated emoji which is used on the workflow application Slack.

Who is Sirocco? Meet the plucky parrot who captured the hearts of the nation with his amorous ways

Love bird: Sirocco, hatched March, 23 1997 is one of the 252 remaining k¿k¿p¿s

Love bird: Sirocco, hatched March, 23 1997 is one of the 252 remaining kākāpōs

Sirocco, hatched March, 23 1997 is one of the 252 remaining kākāpō – a large, flightless, nocturnal parrot – in the world

He achieved fame after appearing on BBC Two’s Last Chance to See in which he attempted to mate with zoologist Mark Carwardine

Sirocco’s reputation as a parrot Lothario saw him become a household name in the bird world and he has attracted visitors to New Zealand

In January 2010 Sirocco was given the title of Official Spokesbird for Conservation by Prime Minister John Key

In this role, Sirocco helps advocate for conservation through human intermediaries on social media sites and blogs

sirocco was the subject of filmmaker Ashwika Kapur’s short ‘rags-to-riches’ documentary Sirocco – How a Dud Became a Stud

He is also the inspiration for the party parrot animated emoji which is used on the workflow application Slack

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